Monthly Archives: July 2006

Arborsculpture, because bansai is so last week? Been looking for the illest trees?

Pretzel Tree, Ninjas

Ill Trees Sun

The ill table and chair

This dude got the illest trees!

Arborsculpture is the art of shaping tree trunks and branches into structures, either with ornamental or functional utility. The table and chair set above are too dope.
Cabinet has an interview with Abrorsculptor Richard Reams, who shapes trees into furniture in sculpture in his home of Oregon and around the world. The interview is great and the pictures are unbelievable.

Interview at Cabinet

via metafilter

Real ninjas reside in transparent solar powered houses. Oh, and did I mention they float on water?


Well, maybe not yet, but I’m saving up… That’s for damn sure. This thing is gonna be fly.

From the site:

“The independece created by a solar generator opens up new opportunities to create new habitable spaces on water…Solar power allows these floating architectures to be fully autonomous and sustainable. No energy bills, integrated water purification and no land needed.”

Word to that. Peep Solar Lab Research and Design and check out their floating houses and solar powered boats. The site is flash so you gotta engage your navigation skills, my ninjas.

Gardening Tips for the Urban Ninja

I know all you ninjas are most likely up on your “gardening” skills, being ninjas and all, hehe… I mean, nevermind.  Even if you been down with the Earfs since day one, you will most likely pick up some new info from this new book.

“Gardens that creep up facades, that nest on rooftops or squeeze into left-over spaces between adjoining walls or between a facade and the street. The contemporary gardens collected in this book are a cross-section of current trends, notable not only for their use of new materials and construction techniques, but above all for their single, shared characteristic: in every case, they are small urban gardens.”
Small Urban Gardens on Amazon

via mocoloco

Adobe?s Platinum Status

Adobe Headquarters

“Electricity consumption has been reduced by 35 percent; irrigation water use has decreased by 75 percent.”

No, Abode hasn’t sold a million copies of Photoshop [actually, they probably have, but that’s not the point]. It has, however, finished work on its headquarters in San Jose, Cali., and received the USGBC’s LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Platinum rating. Not only is this the highest status currently awarded by LEED standards, but the Adobe headquarters is the first commercial building to receive the rating.

Now, I know what you’re thinking…our government funds a green building initiative? I had a hard time believing it myself, but its true! Of course, it was established during the Clinton/Gore years, so no props to the oil hungry Bush administrtion on this one.

Article from ArchRecord

UK Officials Mull Carbon Trading System

carbon.jpg

In the wake of the raw environmental truths that are pollution and global warming UK officials have begun to look into a possible “carbon trading system.”  The system would operate by rationing out a carbon allowance that could be spent with a sort of credit card for gas, air travel, etc.  God forbid your carbon runs out, though.  Then you would be charged for extra carbon.  My ninja, please!

“The overall points distributed would decrease each year as the U.K. aims to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. The system is unlikely to happen in the short term, and Miliband admits that it’s “easy to dismiss the idea as too complex administratively, too utopian, or too much of a burden for citizens.” But individuals account for 44 percent of Britain’s emissions, and Miliband believes a CO2 trading system could be fair and effective.”

Source Article from Grist Magazine

Honk if you love green energy!

Highway Wind 3

Highway Wind 2

A runner-up for Metropolis magazine’s 2006 Next Generation Award, Mark Oberholzer with Wittenberg Oberholzer Architects, Laura Koehler, and Michael Morrow, designed these Highway Divider Wind Turbines. These ninjas designed small conical wind turbines that would sit on the concrete dividers along highways, which would be spun by the air movement created by passing traffic. The electricity generated would be fed into a cable running beneath the dividers, and then into the city grid. Check out the rest of the comp HERE.

Check out the rest of the comp .magazine’s 2006 Next Generation Award, Mark Oberholzer with Wittenberg Oberholzer Architects, Laura Koehler, and Michael Morrow, designed these . These ninjas designed small conical wind turbines that would sit on the concrete dividers along highways, which would be spun by the air movement created by passing traffic. The electricity generated would be fed into a cable running beneath the dividers, and then into the city grid. Check out the rest of the comp .

Highway Wind 1

Wondering why there are no images at Metropolis’ page? That’s because in true ninja fashion this post has the only images on the net [as of now]. Act like you know.

[images from Metropolis Magazine (the actual paper magazine)]

All You Drivers! Who Killed the Electric Car?

Why are we still using the same combustible engine that was invented over a hundred years ago? On the real, this is the 21st century and we need to start acting like it.  It seems like we’re trying to take out the muvva erf once and for all, in as many ways as we can, which is why this movie is so damn shocking.  You’d assume (or hope, at least) that our government and its corporate puppetmaster would put humanity’s survival at the top of their priority list, but as Who Killed the Electric Car reveals, the decisions that shape and reshape policy are all too often made behind closed doors.

Compostable cups, what you know about that?

Green Mountain Coffee Roasters have announced the Ecotainer, a cup made with a corn-based liner which can be returned to the Earth to make soil. I’m glad someone’s thinking!

snippet:

“Why did they bother? Because in 2005, ‘Americans used and discarded 14.4 billion disposable paper cups for hot beverages. If put end-to-end, those cups would circle the earth 55 times. Based on anticipated growth of specialty coffees, that number will grow to 23 billion by 2010—enough to circle the globe 88 times.’”

full article via treehugger